Clearinghouse of Advice for New Assistant Professors

[Most recent update: 09.09.2017.]

The purpose of this post is to catalogue advice from the internet about how to achieve tenure at a research university.

When I was a PhD student, one method of calming my anxiety was to read advice from professors to PhD students; The Professor is In, Fabio Rojas, and Chris Blattman are particularly helpful.  Now that I won the lottery and have started my seven year post-doc, I find myself in a position with even less structure than graduate school.  With no teaching requirements this quarter, my mind has had plenty of time to worry itself.  To my pleasant surprise, however, I have found plenty of online advice about this stage of my career.  The purpose of this post is simply to provide links for my future self and others in the same career stage.  The links are provided in reverse chronological order I found them.

The Difference Between Amateurs and Professionals by Farnam Street – Not aimed specifically at academics, the simple contrasts provided in this article provide nice reminders of “good” behavior.  I think the piece could be called “The Difference Between Graduate Students and Successful Graduate Students”.  My two favorites: “Amateurs see feedback and coaching as someone criticizing them as a person. Professionals know they have weak spots and seek out thoughtful criticism.” and “Amateurs focus on identifying their weaknesses and improving them. Professionals focus on their strengths and on finding people who are strong where they are weak.”

How to Get Tenure (If You’re a Woman) by Erica Chenoweth, Page Fortna, Sara Mitchell, Burcu Savun, Jessica Weeks, and Kathleen Cunningham (h/t Aliza Luft) –  A response from political scientists to Walt’s article below.  Not a challenge, the authors point out how success in the academy, like elsewhere, is gendered.  That said, I read their article and find their advice useful for me as well.  I especially like their focus on setting boundaries, contracting out non-academic work, ignoring haters, networking and self-promotion.

How to Get Tenure (If You’re a Woman) by Stephen Walt – From a very senior political scientist, I had deja vu when reading this piece.  The article consists of ten nuggets of wisdom.  The ones I find most useful are: receiving tenure is a wager on future productivity, publish research that changes how your field thinks and prefer quality over quantity.

The Awesomest 7-Year Postdoc or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Tenure-Track Faculty Life by Radhika Nagpal – While I linked to this article in the post’s second paragraph, it is probably the most well-known in this genre of advice and so should receive emphasis.  The author’s advice: “I decided that this is a 7-year postdoc; I stopped taking advice; I created a ‘feelgood’ email folder; I work fixed hours and in fixed amounts; I try to be the best “whole” person I can; I found real friends; and I have fun ‘now'”.  I realize the irony of taking advice from someone who says to stop taking advice, but I interpret that admonishment’s spirit, not letter.  I have already implemented the ‘feelgood’ folder and confirm its utility.

You and Your Research by Richard Hamming – Yes, that Richard Hamming.  The link is to a speech he gave in 1986 at the Bell Communications Research Colloquium Seminar.  It is one of those pieces that feels like it could have been written yesterday, and each paragraph is reaffirming.  Though not aimed explicitly at professors, much less new ones, it is valuable for anyone who strives to undertake excellent work. My favorite three sentences: “One success brought him [Claude Shannon] confidence and courage.  One of the characteristics of successful scientists is having courage. Once you get your courage up and believe that you can do important problems, then you can.”

Tenure hacks: The 12 secrets of making tenure by Russell James (book) – Amazon recommended this book to me based on Boice’s book.  I also have not read it, but it has more than 4 stars after about a dozen reviews.

Advice for New Faculty Members by Robert Boice (book) – I have not read the book, but it looks comprehensive and is well-reviewed on Amazon.  A summary of the points is at this page.

Advice for New Hires by Pamela Oliver – An article on Insider Higher Ed focusing on the social terrain of assistant professorship.

Advice for New Assistant Professors by Eric Grollman – A compendium of links to other places.

Tips for success on your path to tenure by Rodney E. Rohde – Aimed at the sciences.

Advice for Your First Year on the Tenure Track by Karen Kelsky – Very many good, concise points.  Her points about applying for external funding, building your profile in your discipline, and maintaining personal time are new, for this list to this point.

My Rules of Thumb by Greg Mankiw – A short essay about how he manages his time, not aimed specifically at tenure-track professors.  Some points: surround yourself with good people; manage your time wisely; write well.

Advice for New Junior Faculty by Greg Mankiw – Get your dissertation out the door; good is better than perfect; be a good citizen for your department; network; rejection happens; and don’t blog (written in 2007).

Advice to New Assistant Professors by Chris Blattman – Learn to say no, use blogs and public social media professionally, and other nuggets.

Managing Your Research Pipeline by Matthew J. Lebo – A method for tracking your progress to tenure based on research productivity, from Day 1 to the tenure decision.  Slow and steady wins the race.

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